überspringe Navigation

Tag Archives: ELF

I went to the field while I was 15 years old. … We all (in our whole family) joined the EPLF not the ELF. My brother, the one who is now martyr had taken me to Asmara for school while I was 10 years old. He lived in Asmara. He, however, went to the field in 1977. Then, I also followed him after a while. First, I went to Himbirti to join the EPLF, but then they told me that I was too young to join them. Then, I went to Debarua and joined the ELF in Mendefera. I had one uncle who was the only one in our family to join the ELF …..“

    Dieses Interview führte Quehl im Jahr 1999 mit der weiblichen Person „N.A.”.
  • Quehl, Hartmut: Kämpferinnen und Kämpfer im eritreischen Unabhängigkeitskrieg 1961-1991 – Faktoren der Diversivität und der Kohärenz – Eine historische Untersuchung zur Alltags- und Sozialgeschichte des Krieges. Band 2, 2.1.6. Rekrutierung durch persönliche Beziehungen: religiöse, tribale, blutsverwandtschaftliche Verbindungen und persönliche Bindungen. Felsberg, 2005, S. 40f.

Farbliche Hervorhebungen stammen vom Autor des Blogs.

Advertisements

„In 1974, I joined the ELF. Of course there was national feeling though I was small. I had a brother working underground to the EPLF. I used to read the papers/leaflets he had. Then I began to be affected. The problem was, however, every outlet was closed that we could not join the struggle. Lastly however I joined the ELF when I lacked other alternatives. I didn’t care (whether it was ELF or EPLF), only I knew that the struggle was all about destroying the enemy. … I was 14 years old studying the third grade.

    Dieses Interview führte Quehl im Jahr 1999 mit der männlichen Person „S.I.”.
  • Quehl, Hartmut: Kämpferinnen und Kämpfer im eritreischen Unabhängigkeitskrieg 1961-1991 – Faktoren der Diversivität und der Kohärenz – Eine historische Untersuchung zur Alltags- und Sozialgeschichte des Krieges. Band 2, 2.1.6. Rekrutierung durch persönliche Beziehungen: religiöse, tribale, blutsverwandtschaftliche Verbindungen und persönliche Bindungen. Felsberg, 2005, S. 40.

Farbliche Hervorhebungen stammen vom Autor des Blogs.

„I am Nara [eritreische Volksgruppe, d.V.]. I joined ELF in 1975. (I used to) hear about the struggle and war before (I) joined ELF, … though I was young I was hearing about the outset of the struggle in 1961. Fighters used to come at that time. … They were telling us that the struggle was being waged to free our country and that the people should join the struggle and fight the enemy. … I used to hear that Dngus Arey and the others were making up there around Dieda. But I can’t certainly say what year it was…. At that time (in 1975) many persons were going to the field and I did like that. I was alone when I went to the field. I didn’t tell my parents…. they would have told me to learn, because I was small. That was why I went without telling them. I knew that the fighters were in a place called Girda and I reached there in one day. They were of Dngus Arey. They were saying it was a battalion and it wasn’t clear as it is now. Anyway be it a company or battalion we called it as Dngus Arey’s force. They told me that I would be trained in the unit and later receive my Kalashnikov and fight.“

    Dieses Interview führte Quehl am 15.05.1999 mit der männlichen Person „A.M.A.”.
  • Quehl, Hartmut: Kämpferinnen und Kämpfer im eritreischen Unabhängigkeitskrieg 1961-1991 – Faktoren der Diversivität und der Kohärenz – Eine historische Untersuchung zur Alltags- und Sozialgeschichte des Krieges. Band 2, 2.1.5. Zivile Erfahrungen von Krieg und Gewalt. Felsberg, 2005, S. 37f.

Farbliche Hervorhebungen stammen vom Autor des Blogs.

„Between 1961 and 1963, I used to move between my country and the Sudan. In 03/1964, I came back from the Sudan and joined the revolution. I was deployed to the platoon of Omar Ezaz – Initially they had told me that I should return home because I was young. But then they accepted me when Omar Ezaz came.

    Dieses Interview führte Quehl am 10.03.2000 mit der männlichen Person „M.A.F.”
  • Quehl, Hartmut: Kämpferinnen und Kämpfer im eritreischen Unabhängigkeitskrieg 1961-1991 – Faktoren der Diversivität und der Kohärenz – Eine historische Untersuchung zur Alltags- und Sozialgeschichte des Krieges. Band 2, 2.1.5. Zivile Erfahrungen von Krieg und Gewalt. Felsberg, 2005, S. 37.

Farbliche Hervorhebungen stammen vom Autor des Blogs.

„Aus beiden Fronten finden sich Nachrichten, dass Kinder ihren Vätern folgten: sowohl in ELF als auch in der EPLF fanden sich Beispiele von zwei Generationen von Tagadelti aus der gleichen Familie. [Tagadalit = Kämpfer (Sg.) – Tagadelti = Kämpferinnen und Kämpfer (Pl.) – Wort kommt aus der Tigrinya-Sprache, die in Eritrea gesprochen wird. – d.V.] Und schließlich gab es in der Kindergeneration Fälle, in denen Kinder von Tagadelti in den Lagern der Organisation verblieben, dort aufgezogen und zur Schule geschickt wurden, und so Schritt für Schritt in das Tagadelti-Leben [i.e. Kämpfer-Leben, d.V.] hineinwuchsen.“

  • Quehl, Hartmut: Kämpferinnen und Kämpfer im eritreischen Unabhängigkeitskrieg 1961-1991 – Faktoren der Diversivität und der Kohärenz – Eine historische Untersuchung zur Alltags- und Sozialgeschichte des Krieges. Band 2, 2.1.5. Zivile Erfahrungen von Krieg und Gewalt. Felsberg, 2005, S. 41.